Special Issue 2: Achievements and Future Goals


Tentative Title: Coordination with other international organizations and initiatives

ISWAT Cluster(s): All

First Author/POC: Mamoru Ishii, mishii@nict.go.jp

First Author Affiliation: NICT - National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, JAPAN

Co-authors: Joaquim Costa

Working Abstract:  The field of space weather is quite a huge and it is difficult to observe and forecast whole of it by only one organization or country. International collaboration is essential for operational space weather monitoring and forecast and implemented for long period.Since the beginning of 21th century, a lot of organizations mainly in the United Nations established workshops and started the discussion of space weather, and some of them moved to operational services. These frameworks are based on the meteorology and utility of space which means that space weather information contributes to social activities.

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]

[Wider Space Weather Landscape]


Tentative Title: Global space weather landscape and a road to coordination

ISWAT Cluster(s): All

POCs: Jim Spann (NASA, USA), jim.spann@nasa.gov

Co-authors: 

  • ESA (Jussi Luntama, Alexi Glover)
  • Overview of initiatives/programs in Germany (Jens Berdermann )
  • Italian Space Agency ( Christina Plainaki)
  • National Institute for Astrophysics, Italy (Mauro Messerotti)
  • NASA (Jim Spann)
  • SANSA (Stefan Lotz)
  • Japan (Mamoru Ishii)
  • Mamoru also suggested to collect information from other countries in Asia
  • India (need to talk to Dibyendu)
  • Australia  / New Zealand (Richard Marshall)

Working Abstract:  The paper highlights state of development by different agencies and institutions and outlines the road to coordination

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]

[Wider Space Weather Landscape]


Tentative Title: Interfacing with user groups

ISWAT Cluster(s): All

First Author/POC: Richard Marshall, richard.marshall@bom.gov.au

First Author Affiliation: Australia Bureau of Meteorology, Australia

Co-authors: David Jackson and Terry Onsager

Working Abstract:  

 

Potential beneficiaries of the COSPAR Space Weather Roadmap can be classified in 2 groups – 1) operational space weather service providers which can be viewed as direct users of the science developed through the COSPAR roadmap process; 2) end-users such as the electricity and satellites sectors whose requirements should define the metrics and parameters delivered through the products of space weather service providers, which therefore are intimately linked to the focus and evolution of the COSPAR roadmap.

With regard to Group 1, interaction with COSPAR that feeds Group 2 requirements into the roadmap process may be enhanced via specific activities such as:

  • Participation in COSPAR bodies such as the Panel on Space Weather and ISWAT
  • Participation in ISES and WMO space weather teams that are increasingly engaging with COSPAR to better coordinate research and operational space weather activities
  • Promoting actions to ensure the R2O-O2R circle is complete. This may include adopting specific R2O-O2R actions or best-practice identified through WMO, ISES or COSPAR activities that may also be effectively used to focus future iterations of COSPAR space weather roadmaps.

Regarding group 2), this paper shall provide a short overview of end-user requirements obtained through interaction of the two groups which focus on the four key end-user pathways of Power industry and GICs; Navigation/Communications/Radio; Satellite/Debris Drag; Radiation. These requirements are discussed in more detail in Tier 3 papers. Via these examples, the connection from end-user impacts through to operations through to research requirements can be clarified.

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: The NASA Space Weather Science and Observation Gap Analysis

ISWAT Clusters(s): All

First Author/POC: Angelos Vourlidas,  angelos.vourlidas@jhuapl.edu

First Author Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, USA

Co-authors: Drew Turner, Doug Biesecker, Anthea Coster, Alec Engell, George Ho, Tom Immel, Catherine Keys, Lou Lanzerotti, Gang Lu, Noé Lugaz, Janet Luhmann, Leila Mays, Paul O’Brien, Eddie Semones, Harlan Spence, Lisa Upton, Stephen White

Working Abstract: This document describes the results of a science and measurement gap analysis for the Space Weather Science Application Program (SWxSA) within NASA’s Heliophysics Division (HPD). The analysis was performed by a committee of space weather (SWx) experts from academia, the commercial sector, and the space weather operational and end-user community under a NASA task order to the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The study informs on how measurements from NASA observatories will advance forecasting, nowcasting, and hindcasting (collectively referred to as “*-casting”) capabilities by focusing on two tasks: (1) assess the current state of NASA’s observational capability to address the science of SWx and improve accuracy of predictive SWx *-casting models and (2) identify high-priority measurements critical to improved *-casting that are either at risk or currently unavailable 

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: COSPAR Space Weather Roadmap 2022 - Cluster S1 Review

ISWAT Cluster(s): S1

First Author/POC: Alexei Pevtsov, apevtsov@nso.edu

First Author Affiliation: National Solar Observatory, USA

Co-authors: Dibyendu Nandi (CESSI/IISER Kolkata, India), Ilya Usoskin (University of Oulu, Finland), Alexander Pevtsov (National Solar Observatory, USA)

Working Abstract:  This review paper will be focused on domain, physical phenomena or overarching activities relevant to ISWAT S1 Cluster: Long-term Solar Variability (solar cycle and beyond). It will present comprehensive overview of current state-of-the-art, advancements since the last Roadmap, identify gaps and  opportunities for moving forward within the next 5 years based on on-going and planned missions and available modeling and observational capabilities, and present outlook beyond 5-years and recommendations on reaching long-term goals. 

Links: 

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: S2 Cluster Review

ISWAT Cluster(s): S2

First Author/POC: Charles N. Arge, charles.n.arge@nasa.gov

First Author Affiliation: NASA/GSFC, USA

Co-authors: Martin A. Reiss, Carl J. Henney, James A. Klimchuk, Jon Linker, Karin Muglach, Alexei Pevtsov, Rui F. Pinto, and Samuel Schonfeld.

Working Abstract: Over the past decades, a vast amount of data from ground and space-borne instruments has shown that the Sun's magnetic field primarily determines the structure of the solar wind and heliosphere. The solar magnetic field reaches out into the solar atmosphere, characterized by arches of closed loops connecting opposite polarities and open field lines pulled by the solar wind far into our solar system. This review will discuss key science questions on the solar magnetic field and related phenomena, including the creation of global solar magnetic field maps, observations of open magnetic field regions in X-ray and EUV images, assessment of the magnetic connectivity of the Sun to Earth and spacecraft, and how best to model and predict the observed variability in solar irradiance. In the bigger picture, we will review our current understanding of all these science questions and propose new strategies for closing these gaps.

Links:

[Paper Outline] [References]


Tentative Title: Prediction of Solar Eruptive Events Impacting Space Weather Conditions

ISWAT Cluster(s): S3

First Author/POC: Manolis Georgoulis, manolis.georgoulis@academyofathens.gr

First Author Affiliation:  Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Greece

Possible co-authors: Toriumi, Wang, Yardley, Green, Chintzoglou, Leka, Barnes, Park, Kusano, Guerra, Piana, Nishizuka, Ishii, Aydin, Angryk, Bobra, Kontogiannis, Falconer, Chen, Sadykov, Kitiashvili, Semones, Papaioannou, Bain, Patsourakos, Vourlidas, Antiochos, Kliem, Torok, Panos, Kleint, De Pontieu, Harra, Hoeksema, Hurlburt, Crosby, Malandraki, Richardson, Mays, Bloomfield, Camporeale, Bingham and many more (see outline/drafts for more details)

Working Abstract: 

Links:

[Paper Outline] [References] [Additional Information]


Recent Progress on Understanding Coronal Mass Ejection / Flare Onset by a NASA Living with a Star Focused Science Team

ISWAT Cluster(s): S3

First Author/POC: Mark Linton, mark.linton@nrl.navy.mil

First Author Affiliation: US Naval Research Laboratory, USA

Co-authors:  Spiro Antiochos, Graham Barnes, Yuhong Fan, Judy Karpen, Ben Lynch, Yang Liu

Working Abstract: We present a review of recent progress on the topic of understanding solar coronal mass ejection (CME) onset from both modeling and observational viewpoints, as carried out from 2019 to the present by the NASA Living with a Star Focused Science Team on “Understanding the Onset of Major Solar Eruptions.” Seven groups were formed and then joined together to tackle this problem. The work being carried out by this team explores the role of topology and of helicity transport in creating an environment favorable to CME eruption and to then providing the free energy required for CME onset. It investigates CME energization and initiation via photospheric shearing, via flux rope formation, and via magnetic flux emergence. Models for CME initiation being explored by this team span the range from magnetofrictional to magnetohydrodynamical, and from data inspired to data constrained to data driven. This article will highlight recent progress made in these areas, and summarize ongoing and upcoming challenges to the questions of how, when, and why coronal mass ejections erupt from the sun.

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


CME Propagation Through Ambient Solar Wind - Observations and Model Development

ISWAT Cluster(s): H1, H2

First Author/POC: Manuela Temmer, manuela.temmer@uni-graz.at

First Author Affiliation: University of Graz, AUSTRIA

Co-authors: C. Scolini, I.G. Richardson, S.G. Heinemann, E. Paouris, A. Vourlidas, M. Bisi, and writing teams T. Amerstorfer, N. Al-Haddad, L. Barnard, D. Buresova, S. J. Hofmeister, K. Iwai, L. Jian, N. Lugaz, P.K. Manoharan, W. Mishra, M. Owens, B. Perri, R. Pinto, J. Pomoell, E. Samara, D. Sur, C. Verbeke, A.M. Veronig, B. Zhuang.

Working Abstract: The ISWAT clusters H1+2 have focus on interplanetary space and its characteristics. Solar wind structures stemming from the interrelation between large scale open and closed coronal magnetic fields generate periodically recurring regions of compressed plasma and magnetic field followed by high-speed streams. Short-term reconfiguration of the lower coronal magnetic field generates flare emission and provides energy to accelerate enormous amounts of magnetized plasma and particles into interplanetary space. The dynamic interplay between these phenomena changes interplanetary space on various temporal and spatial scales and has effects on the propagation behavior of individual events. Modelling efforts showed that the available observational input is affected by rather large uncertainties, making reliable forecasts difficult. Moreover, the complexity of interplanetary space certainly increases with enhanced solar activity that models cannot cover. Only by joining forces we gain more knowledge about the relation between the different phenomena, underlying physical processes to improve models and to provide better Space Weather forecasting.

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References] [Additional Information]

Comments to the paper draft can be put directly into the pdf. A paper draft workshop will take place February 7, 2022 18:00-19:30 CET where we will discuss all comments. Make sure to join! WebEx link.

[Space weather: the solar perspective, Manuela Temmer, Living Reviews in Solar Physics (2021) 18:4  https://doi.org/10.1007/s41116-021-00030-3(0123456789]

 


Tentative Title: MUSER and IPS Telescopes for Solar and Space Weather Observations

ISWAT Cluster(s): H1, H2

First Author/POC:  Yihua Yan, yyh@nao.cas.cn

First Author Affiliation:  National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

Co-authors: Wei Wang, Fei Liu, Linjie Chen, Jin Fan, Zhijun Chen, Lihong Geng, Baolin Tan, Chengming Tan, Suli Ma, Xingyao Chen, Zhichao Zhou, Minghui Zhang, Sha, Li, Cang, Su, Jing, Du, Jing Huang, Yin Zhang, Jun Cheng, Xiaoshuai Zhu

Working Abstract: This paper describes the recently-available and near-future solar radio spectroscopy-imaging facilities, as well as the IPS (Interplanetary Scintillation) telescopes under construction in China for solar and heliospheric studies. MUSER (Mingantu spectral radioheliograph) covers 400 MHz-15 GHz frequency range which was constructed during 2009-2016 in Mingantu Observing Station, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences at Zhengxiangbaiqi, Inner Mongolia of China, under the National Major Scientific Research Facility Program of China. At moment MUSER is composed of two arrays with MUSER-I covering 400 MHz-2.0 GHz with 40 4.5m mesh antennas and MUSER-II covering 2-15 GHz with 60 2m dish antennas. MUSER will be extended to cover 30-400 MHz frequency regime with 224 LPDAs (log-periodic dipole antennas) under the Meridian-II Project, which is a National Science Infrastructure Project of China, to be constructed in the next two years. MUSER will provide solar radio images monitoring the solar eruptions from solar surface into interplanetary space. An IPS telescope array is going to be built in the next two years under the same National Science Infrastructure Project of China, with the main IPS telescope of three 140m*40m cylinder antennas located in MUSER site and two 30m antennas in two nearby counties each about 200 km apart. The working frequency will be at 327 MHz and 654 MHz with dual linear polarizations. The cylinder antennas will have a sky zenith angle of 60 degrees and be able to observe thousands of radio sources. The IPS telescope will provide important information about solar wind and solar eruptions from the Sun to the Earth environment. The MUSER and IPS telescopes at Mingantu Observing Station,  National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences will play important role in solar and space weather studies. 

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: Current Understanding and Future Perspectives of the Radiation Environment in Heliosphere 

ISWAT Cluster(s): H3

First Author/POC: Jingnan Guo, jnguo@ustc.edu.cn

First Author Affiliation: University of Science and Technology, China

Co-authors: Christina Cohen (US), Janet Luhmann (US), Katie Whitmann (US), Leila Mays (US), Hazel Bain (US), Silvia Dalla (UK), Olga Malandraki (Greece), Nina Dresing (Finland), Linghua Wang (China)

Working Abstract:

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References] 

[Space Radiation iBook]


Evolving approaches towards Planetary Space Weather: lessons learned and future perspectives

ISWAT Clusters(s): H4

First Author/POC: Elias Roussos, roussos@mps.mpg.de

First Author Affiliation: Max-Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Germany

Co-authors: Christina Plainaki, Chuanfei Dong, Insoo Jun, Reka Winslow, Zhonghua Yao, Gina DiBraccio, James Slavin, Yuxi Chen, Anna Milillo, Moa Persson, Glyn Collinson, James Green, Jingnan Guo, Alessandro Mura, William Dunn, Shahab Fatemi, Liang Wang, Kostas Dialynas, Christina Lee, Stefano Massetti, Zhenguang Huang

Working Abstract: With increasing efforts in space exploration, the need for an in depth understanding of the space environments around planetary bodies other than Earth emerges. Environmental specification for the design and maintenance of spacecraft and systems in space requires a strongly interdisciplinary approach in the field of Planetary Space Weather science. Of key importance is the improvement of our ability to predict the fluxes of energetic particles that can be detected when a shock passes by a spacecraft, since they can pose major hazards due to Space Weather phenomena. In this paper, we review the scientific aspects of planetary space weather at different regions of our Solar System and beyond, applying a comparative analysis that, where possible, includes a direct reference to the circumterrestrial case. We review the nature of the interactions between the environment of a Solar System body other than the Earth and the impinging plasma/radiation, and we offer some considerations related to the planning of future space observations, also in view of Solar System exploration. We also highlight the importance of such comparative studies for data interpretation in the context of future space missions. Finally, we discuss some strategical approaches from a scientific and an operational point of view.

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: Geomagnetic Environment: Progress and Gaps in Understanding, Prediction, and Impacts

ISWAT Cluster(s): G1

First Author/POC: Hermann Opgenoorth, hermann.opgenoorth@umu.se

First Author Affiliation:  Umeå University, Sweden

Co-authors: Robinson and all G2 cluster members

Working Abstract: 

Links: [Paper Outline and References] [Paper Draft] [Additional Information]


Tentative Title: Neutrals and satellite drag pathways

ISWAT Clusters(s): G2A

First Author/POC: Sean Bruinsma, sean.bruinsma@cnes.fr

First Author Affiliation: CNES, The National Centre for Space Studies, Toulouse, FRANCE

Co-authors: TBD

Working Abstract: TBD

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: Ionosphere variability 1

ISWAT Clusters(s): G2B

Paper planning team:

First Author/POC: 

First Author Affiliation: 

Co-authors: TBD

Working Abstract: TBD

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: Ionosphere Variability 2

ISWAT Clusters(s): G2A

Paper planning team:

First Author/POC: 

First Author Affiliation: 

Co-authors: TBD

Working Abstract: TBD

Links: 

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: Lightening in Spacecraft: A Review of Internal Charging: Environment, Effect, Prevention, and Mitigation 

ISWAT Cluster(s): G3

First Author: Wousik Kim, Wousik.Kim@jpl.nasa.gov

First Author Affiliation:  NASA/JPL, USA

Corresponding Author: Insoo Jun, Insoo.Jun@jpl.nasa.gov

Other Co-authors: TBD

Working Abstract: We provide a comprehensive overview of a radiation effect commonly encountered in space missions called inertial electrostatic discharge (IESD) or internal charging, deep dielectric charging, or bulk dielectric charging. IESD is a result of complex interplay of many different factors including particular mission design, mission’s radiation environment associated with the mission design, material properties, material geometry, and shielding. Among these, the radiation environment is mostly relevant with space weather phenomena. Therefore, our review focuses on the space weather aspects of the relevant IESD radiation environment while we provide rather succinct (and short) descriptions on other factors. As a review paper, our intent is to provide a synopsis of the current state of the discipline and a summary of the gap analyses. We also describe approaches/methods frequently used to prevent and mitigate IESD.

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: Environment specification accuracy requirements for anomaly resolution in various orbits 

ISWAT Cluster(s): G3

First Author/POC: Alexander Boyd (alexander.j.boyd@aero.org)

First Author Affiliation:  Aerospace Corporation, USA

Co-authors: Paul OBrian (paul.obrien@aero.org), Jeffery Cox ( jeffery.m.cox@aero.org)

Working Abstract: 

Spacecraft anomaly attribution typically requires careful examination of the local space environment. However, this process can be strongly influenced by errors inherent in the environmental data. This can result in false negatives where environment induced anomalies occur during a benign (“green”) environment. Here, we quantify the impact of that error, determining what level of environmental data accuracy is required for anomaly resolution. Results are presented for each of the spacecraft anomaly types (surface charging, internal charging, single event effects) across multiple orbit regimes (including GEO, MEO and LEO).

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: Progress and future needs of the G3 cluster

ISWAT Cluster(s): G3

First Author/POC: Yihua Zheng, yihua.zheng@nasa.gov

First Author Affiliation: NASA/GSFC, USA

Co-authors: Ian Mann,  G3 team leads and experts in the field

Working Abstract: 

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


Tentative Title: Enhancing space weather research by improving information architecture

ISWAT Cluster(s): O2

First Author/POC: Arnaud Masson, Arnaud.Masson@esa.int

First Author Affiliation:  ESA/ESAC - European Space Agency, Spain

Co-authors: Shing Fung <shing.f.fung@nasa.gov>

Working Abstract: 

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]


TBD

ISWAT Cluster(s): TBD

First Author/POC: Adam Kellerman, akellerman@epss.ucla.edu

First Author Affiliation:  

Co-authors: Alexa Halford

Working Abstract: 

Links:

[Paper Outline] [Paper Draft] [References]